CPR First-Aid Class

We finally took our CPR/First-Aid training for our adoption from foster care. The classes cost $45 per person for both. We were scheduled for a few weeks ago, but it was rescheduled because the parking lot was being repaved or something. We both work with children so we’ve both taken the training a few times before so I wasn’t thrilled about taking it again, BUT this things have changed since the last time we took it!

We covered adults and children and were able to practice CPR on adult-sized and child-sized mannequins using one-way face shields. We  used an AED machine (you know I jumped up when he said that he needed a volunteer! Lol) with CPR on a mannequin and we practiced with those sqeezie things that give breathe of life like you see on tv. We also learned simple first-aid techniques.

CPR Part

If the person is breathing:

You notice a person that may need your help.

You do shake and shout (“Hey, hey, are you okay?”)

The person is unresponsive, but IS breathing.

You call 911 and stay with them monitoring their pulse and breathing.

 

If the person is not breathing:

You notice a person that may need your help.
You do shake and shout (“Hey, hey, are you okay?”)

The person is unresponsive and is NOT breathing, but there IS a pulse.

You assign a specific person to call 911.

You do breaths of life while keeping your fingers on their pulse.

 

If the person is not breathing and does not have a pulse:

You notice a person that may need your help.
You do shake and shout (“Hey, hey, are you okay?”)

The person is unresponsive and is NOT breathing, and there is NOT a pulse.

You assign a specific person to call 911.

You start doing 30 compressions and then 2 breathes 5 cycles at a time until help arrives, the person can breath on their own, or you get too tired to continue.

What changed:

You don’t do a blind sweep of the mouth anymore. You have to open the mouth and look before sticking your fingers down someone’s throat. That change was pretty nice! Lol

First-Aid

The best things I learned were:

  • Call 911 from a landline because your address pops up as soon as you are connected. Don’t waste time speaking with the person. If you can, put the 911 operator on speaker and answer their questions. If you can’t, then when the person answers tell them, “I know the address came up. I’m doing 30 compression and 2 breath cycles. Please come now.” then put the phone down so the 911 operator can hear you and continue. Don’t waste time answering questions. If the person is not breathing and has no pulse then you have no time to talk on the phone!
  • Conscious shock patients need positive reinforcement more than anything else. The mind is powerful. Even if nothing is wrong with them physically, they can become overwhelmed if not calmed down. Keep them warm, speak to them gently and reassure them.
  • With a conscious person you need to do 3 things immediately: get permission to treat them, find out their chief complaint and determine level of consciousness (LOC). Ask, “What’s your name? What day is it? What happened here?”

Of course, there are many things that we learned during those classes and all of that can’t be conveyed in a blog post. I think that every American should be required to take these classes. We need to learn to take care of each other!

 

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